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Resource Center: Live

Dentists are exposed to the noise of handpieces and ultrasonic scalers, at levels of 60-99 decibels. While this level of noise presents only a minimal risk of hearing loss, sustained exposure can result in sensorineural hearing loss. Just as you tell your patients to brush and floss to prevent oral diseases, you can practice what you preach and adopt some preventive measures to preserve your ...
Attaining work-life balance in dentistry does not have to be a difficult task. This is especially true if you own your practice because it allows you to schedule patient appointments at convenient times. That being said, finding a balance can be difficult if you’re dealing with other life situations, such as starting a family, making time for older kids’ busy schedules or taking care ...
By: David Taliaferro, PT, DPT, Sports Medicine Physical Therapist, All Children's Hospital Child Development and Rehabilitation Center
We often hear about how important posture is, especially in relation to the work-place.  As a dentist, a majority of the time is spent in the forward flexed position.  As a dentist works on a patient, he/she maintains a seated position.  Furthermore, he/she is often leaned over in order to appropriately visualize the patient.  As the dentist leans forward he creates a rounding of the shoulder, a forward head posture, and a rounding of the lumbar spine.  The dentist may sustain this posture for mi